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Designboom® names the Top 10 Large Scale Art Installations of 2014

Art Scene

Designboom® names the Top 10 Large Scale Art Installations of 2014

From a sea of 888,000 ceramic poppies spilling from the Tower of London, to a 60 ton underwater sculpture, 2014 saw a number of notable large-scale installations completed around the globe. So begins designboom’s tribute to the Top 10 Large Scale Installations of 2014.

Opening up the list is Veil, a project by Fujiko Nakaya, the first site-specific project centered on Philip Johnson’s 1949 architectural masterpiece in New Canaan, Connecticut. For approximately ten minutes every hour, the mid-century modern icon was inundated with fog, obscuring it completely in contrast to the building’s open-to-nature, transparent atmosphere.

In honor of Remembrance Day, the annual holiday commemorating armed forces who died in the line of duty, artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper filled the moat surrounding the Tower of London with 888,246 ceramic poppies to suggest “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red.”

All of the projects on designboom’s list are impressive, awe-inspiring and deliver tremendous visual impact. Even more impressive is the artists’ ability to provide such intimate, perception-changing, and moving experiences in large-scale formats. The use of grand scale gives the viewer a sense of proportion with ‘larger’ issues at hand. For instance, by filling a stark white gallery interior with a cascading, hilly lawn of grass in Not Red But Green, artist Per Kristian Nygård changes the viewer’s perception of the natural world.

Click here for designboom’s full list.

image © Richard Lea-Hair / Historic Royal Palaces

image © Richard Lea-Hair / Historic Royal Palaces

photo © Jason Decaires Taylor

photo © Jason Decaires Taylor

photo by Richard Barnes 2014 / courtesy of the Glass House

photo by Richard Barnes 2014 / courtesy of the Glass House

photo by Jason Olav Benjamin Havneraas / courtesy of noplace

photo by Jason Olav Benjamin Havneraas / courtesy of noplace

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