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Creative at Work: Duggal’s Kimberly Schneider Photographs “Trove from Forgotten Artist”

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Creative at Work: Duggal’s Kimberly Schneider Photographs “Trove from Forgotten Artist”

Duggal Visual Solutions is where creatives come to pursue their passions in art and commerce alike. We’re always impressed by the work our team members are doing outside of the office—like Kimberly Schneider’s recent hand in Eve M. Kahn’s biography, “Forever Seeing New Beauties: The Forgotten Impressionist Mary Rogers Williams, 1857-1907.”

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In 2013, when Schneider first met Kahn (then-Antiques columnist for The New York Times), Schneider just happened to have prints of her personal photography with her.

“[Kahn] was able to visualize how my eye would translate to other types of photography and was immensely appreciative of it,” Schneider said. “Any time she had something artistic, she would bring me freelance shooting work.”

In 2014, Kahn clued Schneider into her finding of Williams’ personal correspondence, both to and from the artist, along with photos, postcards and more, giving Schneider free reign to document the materials creatively. 

Schneider explains:

“I opted for natural lighting, to go with the feel of the artifacts (also my personal preference), and the lighting was quite mixed in Eve’s beautiful home, so I was basically moving things from room to room as the light changed.

Most of the shoot was handheld with a 30-D and minimal editing. The collage images were actually the very last images I shot, as finding the right materials that worked well visually took quite a bit of time—and Eve had boxes of items. I ended up throwing in the confetti at the last minute on a whim, and Eve loved it.”

Four years later, Kahn asked Schneider for permission to use two of her images in “Forever Seeing New Beauties,” which sold out in New York City the day it was released. From Art Daily:

“Kahn’s book luminously reproduces Williams’s under-appreciated paintings, with foresightedly proto-modernist wispy brushstrokes. Williams captured pensive gowned women, Norwegian slopes reflected in icy waters, saw-tooth rooflines on French chateaus, and incense hazes in Italian chapels. Kahn also offers a vivid portrayal of Williams’s equally adventurous friends, who defied their era’s expectations for women intellectuals.”

Congratulations to Kimberly and Eve on a highly acclaimed collaboration. See more of Kimberly’s work at www.kimberlyjschneider.com, and purchase “Forever Seeing New Beauties: The Forgotten Impressionist Mary Rogers Williams, 1857-1907” on Amazon.

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